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Whitefriars

When the Inner Ring Road was routed across the frontage of this ancient building its setting was destroyed forever. These days it rarely opens to the public as it now houses museum records and artifacts while the new Herbert is under construction.

Founded in 1342, the surviving building is all that is left of the Carmelite friary known as Whitefriars because of the colour of the friars' habits. After dissolution the site was purchased by John Hales for conversion to a private residence.

When the Inner Ring Road was routed across the frontage of this ancient building its setting was destroyed forever. These days it rarely opens to the public. 

Founded in 1342, the surviving building is all that is left of the Carmelite friary known as Whitefriars because of the colour of the friars' habits. After dissolution the site was purchased by John Hales for conversion to a private residence.

Of special interest and visable from the exterior, is the bay window specially built for Queen Elizabeth I so she could wave to her subjects when she stayed at Whitefriars.

From 1801 until the end of the Second World War the monastery was employed as the Coventry Workhouse or "House of Industry" to give work, clothing and food to the poor under the Poor Law acts.